Visiting our scholars at home in Ethiopia is quite different from home visits elsewhere, since at each home there are 8-10 kids of all ages, all competing for our attention. But I think we managed pretty well! Of course, bringing glow sticks helped a lot here, too (as it did in Uganda!)

Photo by Kate LordThey even got a little creative with theirs — performing dances to Michael Jackson when the power went out (unfortunately, no photos to prove it), and coming up with creative places to keep them:

Photo by Kate Lord

They also taught us a lot of games, including Injera Wot, a matching card game that every single kid I’ve met knows and loves to play. In exchange, we taught them slap jack — sorry, Moms.

Photo by Kate Lord

Photo by Kate Lord

Our hair was also a point of amusement with a lot of the students, especially the girls. In Hosanna house, we had our hair pulled into ’60s-style ponytails, and then we each had a set of braids wrapping halfway around our heads before we were quite sure what was happening.

Photo by Kate Lord

Photo by Kate Lord

Photo by Kate Lord

Photo by Kate Lord

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We also got to see what helps the households to run so smoothly, with so many kids. Each has his or her own set of responsibilities, including helping in the kitchen and cleaning around the house.

Sentayehu, 19, chops vegetables. Photo by Kate Lord

Sentayehu, 19, chops vegetables. Photo by Kate Lord

It’s kind of unbelievable that harmony can exist in a setting with so many people, but they make it work and then some.